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T-SQL Tuesday #107 – My Death March Project

This month I have the honor of hosting T-SQL Tuesday #107 about Death March Projects. The topic for this months T-SQL Tuesday #107 (hosted by yours truly Blog/Twitter) is:

“Tell me your project horror stories – the worse the better”

Through some redaction, slight change of facts, and creative control with some details I will protect the innocent; and in this case, the guilty as well.

If you don’t have time to read my lengthy exposition then please skip down to the section titled “The Making of a Death March Project”.

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T-SQL Tuesday #107 Invitation: Death March

There is a famous book in our field written in the 2000’s by Ed Yourdon called “Death March“. In it he details the phenomenon in project management of death march software projects. He observed a trend in organizations who plan software projects to estimate so poorly that completion becomes overwhelming and unlikely.

More companies than ever before could be considered “software companies”. Project planning hasn’t gotten much better over time and we still have terribly managed projects. The best reason to explain this I found on Quora – Why are software development task estimations regularly off by a factor of 2-3? In particular, read the answer by Michael Wolfe midway through the page. It is both a humorous and scary analogy.

On this month of Halloween we are going to discuss our death march project horrors!

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Shrink the DB - gonna have a bad time

Stop and Think Before You Shrink – Shrinking a SQL Server Database

I like Halloween so I find myself getting mentally ready each year about a couple of months prior. My mind turns to horrors and I must warn wary travelers in DBA-land about an evil I see all too often – shrinking a database.

I know this has been done to death but I still see it. Gather around the fire as I tell you the ills of shrinking database files.

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Prison Window

The Prisoners Dilemma of Defect Disclosure

Cory Doctorow wrote an excellent piece about the disclosure of software security defects. The post “Telling the Truth About Defects in Technology Should Never, Ever, Ever Be Illegal. EVER.” spells out the current predicament and suggests a way forward.

This topic is contemporary, impactful, and fascinating. It spans various domains such as InfoSec, free speech, censorship, and private corporate rights

Read on as I analyze the article and offer my thoughts about security vulnerability disclosures.

Feature Image Attribution and License.

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